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Hypermobility Syndrome Symptoms

A woman with a hyper extend elbow

Ever heard of Hypermobility Syndrome? If you’re like most people, you probably haven’t. And yet, this condition is more common than you might think, especially among children and young adults. In fact, up to 15% of kids have hypermobile joints that usually tighten up to a normal range of motion as they get older. But for some, their joints don’t tighten with age, leading to a host of painful symptoms as they go through life.

In this blog, we’ll delve into the world of Hypermobility Syndrome, shedding light on what it is, how it’s caused, and the issues that come along with it. We’ll debunk some myths, clarify some misconceptions, and hopefully leave you with a better understanding of this often misunderstood condition. So, buckle up and let’s dive in, shall we?

What is Hypermobility Syndrome?

Hypermobility Syndrome, in its simplest terms, means your joints are more flexible and have a wider range of motion than normal. It’s like being double-jointed, but on a whole new level. Sounds cool, right? Well, not quite. While this increased flexibility might make you the star of the show in a yoga class, it can also lead to a whole host of problems, especially if your joints don’t tighten up as you age.

But why does this happen? Why do some people’s joints remain flexible while others tighten up? The answer lies in a protein called collagen, the “glue” that holds all our joints and tissues together. When this collagen is affected by inherited genetic defects or injuries, it can lead to Hypermobility Syndrome.

Now, before we go any further, let’s clear up one thing: not all hypermobility is bad. In fact, in most cases, it causes no problems and presents no symptoms. But when it does, it can be quite debilitating, leading to conditions such as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) and Marfan Syndrome (MFS). So, now that we’ve got a basic understanding of what Hypermobility Syndrome is, let’s delve a little deeper and look at the causes and issues that come along with it. Ready? Let’s go!

Understanding Hypermobility Syndrome

So, we’ve established that Hypermobility Syndrome is all about having joints that are more flexible than usual. But what does this really mean? And how does it affect those who have it?

Let’s take a closer look.

Imagine your body as a well-oiled machine, with your joints acting as the hinges that allow movement. Now, imagine if those hinges were a little too loose, allowing the machine parts to move more than they should. That’s essentially what happens in Hypermobility Syndrome. The joints, which should ideally move within a certain range, end up moving beyond that range, leading to potential problems.

But why does this happen? Well, the answer lies in our genes. Hypermobility Syndrome is often caused by inherited genetic defects that affect the body’s production of collagen. Remember how we said collagen is the “glue” that holds our joints and tissues together? Well, when this glue isn’t as strong as it should be, it can lead to joints that are more flexible than normal. In some cases, hypermobility can also be caused by injury. For instance, if a joint is injured and doesn’t heal properly, it can end up being more flexible than it was before the injury.

Now, it’s important to note that not everyone with hypermobile joints will experience problems. In fact, many people with hypermobility lead perfectly normal lives without any issues. However, for some, this increased flexibility can lead to a host of painful symptoms, which we’ll delve into in the next section.

So, there you have it – a deeper understanding of Hypermobility Syndrome. It’s not just about being able to do the splits or bend your fingers in weird ways. It’s a condition that can have a significant impact on a person’s life, especially if it leads to painful symptoms.

Causes of Hypermobility Syndrome

Now that we’ve got a handle on what Hypermobility Syndrome is, let’s delve into the why. Why do some people have this increased joint flexibility? And why does it cause problems for some but not for others? The answers to these questions lie in the intricate workings of our bodies, specifically in our genes and our collagen.

As we mentioned earlier, one of the main causes of Hypermobility Syndrome is inherited genetic defects. These defects can affect the body’s production of collagen, the protein that acts as the “glue” holding our joints and tissues together. When this collagen isn’t as strong or as plentiful as it should be, it can lead to joints that are more flexible than normal.

But it’s not just about the genes. Injuries can also play a role in causing Hypermobility Syndrome. If a joint is injured and doesn’t heal properly, it can end up being more flexible than it was before the injury. This is why it’s so important to take care of our bodies and ensure that injuries are properly treated and healed.

Now, you might be wondering: if Hypermobility Syndrome is caused by genetic defects and injuries, why doesn’t everyone with these issues have the syndrome? Well, the answer is that not everyone with hypermobile joints will develop Hypermobility Syndrome. In fact, many people with hypermobile joints lead perfectly normal lives without any issues. However, for some, this increased flexibility can lead to a host of painful symptoms.

And this brings us to the crux of the matter. Hypermobility Syndrome isn’t just about having flexible joints. It’s about how these joints affect our lives, especially when they lead to painful symptoms. In the next section, we’ll delve into these symptoms and the issues they can cause. So, stick around – there’s still a lot to learn!

Symptoms of Hypermobility Syndrome

Alright, we’ve covered the what and the why of Hypermobility Syndrome. Now, let’s get into the nitty-gritty: the symptoms. What does it actually feel like to have this condition? And how does it affect daily life? Let’s find out.

First off, it’s important to note that not everyone with hypermobile joints will experience symptoms. In fact, many people with hypermobility lead perfectly normal lives without any issues. However, for those who do experience symptoms, they can be quite varied and, in some cases, quite severe.

One of the most common symptoms of Hypermobility Syndrome is joint dislocation. This is when a joint moves out of its normal position, causing pain and potentially limiting movement. This can happen in any joint but is most common in the shoulders, knees, and fingers.

Another common symptom is chronic fatigue. This isn’t just feeling tired after a long day; it’s a persistent sense of exhaustion that doesn’t go away with rest. This can make it difficult to carry out daily activities and can significantly impact a person’s quality of life.

Frequent injuries, such as sprains and strains, are also common in people with Hypermobility Syndrome. This is because their joints are more flexible than normal, making them more prone to injury.

Digestive issues, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), can also occur in people with Hypermobility Syndrome. This is because the body’s connective tissues, which include the tissues in the digestive system, can be affected by the condition.

Some people with Hypermobility Syndrome may also have thin and fragile skin that bruises easily. This is due to the collagen abnormalities that are often present in the condition. Other symptoms can include scoliosis (a curvature of the spine), poor balance and coordination, and even heart problems in some cases.

As you can see, Hypermobility Syndrome can have a significant impact on a person’s life. But it’s not all doom and gloom. With the right treatment and management strategies, people with Hypermobility Syndrome can lead healthy, fulfilling lives. So, if you or someone you know is dealing with this condition, don’t lose hope. There are ways to manage these symptoms and live a full and active life. Stay tuned for our next blog where we’ll delve into these strategies in more detail. Until then, take care!